AHF funded projects feature in the 2019 MacEwen Awards

Campbeltown Picture House (c) Keith Hunter

Campbeltown Picture House (c) Keith Hunter

Named after Anni and Malcolm MacEwen, the MacEwen Awards recognises and celebrates architecture for the common good. Now in its fourth year we are pleased to note that AHF funded projects featured amongst those longlisted and shortlisted for the award. It is satisfying to know that AHF funding has gone some way to helping these projects become architecturally commended.  Well done to The Kirkmichael Trust, Bridport Area Development Trust and Campbeltown Community Business Ltd!

Shortlisted for the MacEwen Prize - Campbeltown Picture House, Argyll & Bute Scotland

(c) Keith Hunter

(c) Keith Hunter

Sitting in a prominent position on Campbeltown’s waterfront, the Picture House is one of the earliest purpose-built cinemas in Scotland. This Category-A listed building opened in 1913 and was designed by Glasgow cinema architect, Albert V. Gardner, in a Glasgow School of Art Nouveau style. Gardner returned in 1934/5 to update the building with an ‘atmospheric’ interior, one that has survived to the present day and which includes the ‘wee houses’ either side of the screen. Community Business Limited took ownership of it in 1987. The restoration project was undertaken by the architects Burrell Foley Fisher and was completed in December 2017 following a successful 9-year campaign which raised over £3.5million to create a modern cinema destination complete with a second screen, foyer, café and spaces for exhibitions, and community activities. An AHF grant of £15,000 helped pay for a project organiser and in 2018 Campbeltown won an award at the Scottish Heritage Angel Awards for Best Major Regeneration of an Historic Building or Place.

Longlisted for the MacEwen Prize - Kirkmichael, Black Isle, Scotland

Kirkmichael Trust 2.jpg

The Kirkmichael project was initiated by community concern over the steady deterioration in the church at Kirkmichael. The earliest records of the Kirkmichael parish date to the early 1400s and the chancel of the church was converted to a mausoleum in 1560. In 2002 The Kirkmichael Trust formed to restore and maintain the building and associated mausolea and came to the AHF for support of their project. Funding from the AHF included a Project Development Grant of £14,289 in 2014. This enabled the Trust to compile a project plan and develop successful major funding bids. An AHF loan offer was administered in 2015 to cover the projects working capital requirements, allowing work to continue in between payments from major funders. The project architect was McGregor Bowes and the restoration was completed in the Spring of 2017. Today the Kirk is open to the public where there is a unique display of medieval ornamental crosses. In 2018 it won an award at the Scottish Heritage Angel Awards for Best Heritage Research, Interpretation or Recording.

Longlisted for the MacEwen Prize - Bridport Literary & Scientific Institute, England

(c) Ed Ovenden

(c) Ed Ovenden

The Grade II* listed building was constructed in 1835, initially as a Mechanics Institute for the education and training of Bridport’s young men and later as Bridport’s School of Art a Men’s Club, Red Cross depot and library until its closure in 1997. It stood empty for many years and slowly deteriorated to such an extent it was placed on Historic England’s ‘Heritage at Risk’ register. Bridport Area Development Trust eventually acquired the building in 2012. It commissioned the architects Architecton and the Trust successfully raised £2.1 million, including a £200,000 AHF Challenge Fund grant to restore the building and create a community hub providing training facilities, meeting rooms and co-working spaces.